A Recipe for Success

A Recipe for Success

When funds are tight, it becomes even more important that any windfall is not wasted, but rather gives as much bang for the buck as possible. And, even after a brief look at Stevens Point Country Club, it’s not hard to agree that they have done exactly that.

Designed originally by architect Larry Packard, Stevens Point, located in central Wisconsin, looked a lot like many other mid-century layouts - wall to wall green, from grass and trees. But, like so much of this part of Wisconsin, Stevens Point is built on sand, and that proved to be its saving grace when it lost a large portion of its tree stock because of the use of the DuPont herbicide Imprelis.

Stevens Point is now managed by Oliphant Golf, and that fact meant that Oliphant partner Craig Haltom, a young man trying to develop his reputation as a golf architect, saw a lot of the course. Haltom, who found the property later developed by Mike Keiser as Sand Valley (the Craig’s Porch snack hut at Sand Valley is named for him.) The settlement of the Imprelis legal case meant Stevens Point was in line for a substantial windfall: Haltom proposed to the members spending some of the money on a radical project involving taking out further trees, completely rebunkering the course and turning a traditional parkland course into something far rougher around the edges, with exposed sand and large bunkers dominating the view.

Golf Inc. 2019 Development of the Year: Mammoth Dunes

Golf Inc. 2019 Development of the Year: Mammoth Dunes

When you Wisconsin, think golf. Indeed, think great golf. Already home to acclaimed courses such as Whistling Straits and Erin Hills, Wisconsin is now home to Mammoth Dunes, Golf Inc. magazein’s 2019 Development of the Year first-place winner.

Mammoth Dunes is the latest addition to Sand Valley Golf Resort, the Mike Keiser development in central Wisconsin built on isolated, dune-peppered land carved out by glaciers.

Golf Digest's Best New Course of 2017: Sand Valley

Golf Digest's Best New Course of 2017: Sand Valley

Sand Valley was not Keiser's dream. It was that of Craig Haltom, at one time a golf-course shaper (now a partner with his old boss, Mike Oliphant, in a firm called Oliphant-Haltom Golf). Haltom wanted to design and build his own course, and he scoured Wisconsin searching for the perfect site. More than a decade ago, he discovered an unharvested pine plantation southeast of tiny Nekoosa and 108 miles north of Madison: 1,500 acres of red pines, planted in rows, running up and down enormous hills that reached up to 80 feet high. With pure sand beneath, deposited eons ago by a glacial lake, it was ideal for golf—nothing supports the game better than a deep strata of sand offering perfect drainage and firm turf. Haltom had not nearly enough money to purchase the land, so he sought an investor, eventually Keiser among the prospects. Keiser first saw the property in 2013.

Central Wisconsin becoming hot golf destination

Central Wisconsin becoming hot golf destination

Soaring sand dunes flank the winding entrance to Sand Valley and then the golf course appears – a moonscape of sand blowouts, jagged ridges and green fairways snaking to the horizon.

Are you in Montana? Idaho? Abu Dhabi?

None of the above. You’re in the sand barrens of central Wisconsin, near the Town of Rome, which is not to be confused with its namesake in Italy. You’re about as far removed from civilization as a golfer can get. And as close to heaven.

Golf Inc. honors The Beloit Club for its cosmetic, financial makeover, names it nation's most improved private club

Golf Inc. honors The Beloit Club for its cosmetic, financial makeover, names it nation's most improved private club

The massive makeover of the CC of Beloit into The Beloit Club and the financial turnaround that followed it are starting to gain recognition nationally.

The club received the first-place honor for most improved among private clubs from Golf Inc. magazine. It was one of 10 courses recognized by the magazine in its November/December issue for improved business operations and customer amenities in an increasingly difficult financial climate.

Stevens Point golf course gets $3M facelift

Stevens Point golf course gets $3M facelift

“The amount of trees that had to be cut down was a loss, but it started a conversation that is leading to what we think will be some exciting changes,” said Haltom. “It’s not a small project and very ambitious, but the memberships has been very supportive.”

Haltom said the renovation is the first major work on the course, located at 1628 Country Club Drive in Stevens Point, in decades. After receiving its state charter in 1925, a nine-hole course was completed at the club in 1927 followed by the expansion to an 18-hole course in 1965.

Oliphant Golf to manage The Golf Courses of Lawsonia

Oliphant Golf to manage The Golf Courses of Lawsonia

Madison-based Oliphant Golf Management assumed the operation of The Golf Courses of Lawsonia on a lease arrangement effective March 1, the Green Lake Conference Center announced.

The Golf Courses of Lawsonia -- the Links and Woodlands -- will remain public courses, with annual memberships and daily play available as in the past.

Oliphant also will oversee Lawsonia's pro shop and restaurant operation. Formerly known as the Caddyshack, the restaurant's name has been changed to Langford's Pub after Links Course designer William Langford.

Jeff Kleinke, the director of golf, and Nick Lueptow, the restaurant manager, will continue to manage the pro shop and restaurant business.

"I am excited to see Lawsonia as a whole benefit from the expertise and the passion of The Oliphant Companies for creating outstanding golf experiences," Ben Mott, president of the Green Lake Conference Center, said in a news release.